You searched for articles by ''bradley' in British Journal of Renal Medicine. There are 71 results listed below

Article title: Genomic sequencing – spot the difference
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: June 2018, Volume 23 Number 2
Pages: 35-35
Intro: No article summary available.


Article title: Comment: Homeward bound
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Spring 2018, Volume 23 Number 1
Pages: 3-3
Intro: No article summary available.


Article title: Comment: See one, do one, teach one
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Winter 2017, Volume 22 Number 4
Pages: 99-99
Intro: No article summary available.


Article title: Comment: To err is human; improving dialysis safety
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Autumn 2017, Volume 22 Number 3
Pages: 67-67
Intro: No article summary available.


Article title: Comment: A matter of choice
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Summer 2017, Volume 22 Number 2
Pages: 35-35
Intro: The International Alliance of Patients' Organizations (IAPO) describes patient centred healthcare as a healthcare system designed and delivered to address the healthcare needs and preferences of patients so that healthcare is appropriate and cost-effective. The IAPO has defined five principles that should form the basis of patient-centred healthcare: respect, choice and empowerment, patient involvement in health policy, access and support, and information. Providing accurate, relevant, and complete information in a format that is accessible and takes account of language and cultural differences among patients and carers is fundamental to shared care.


Article title: Comment: Modifying risk in chronic kidney disease: the future is Bright
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Spring 2017, Volume 22 Number 1
Pages: 3-3
Intro: Most people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) do not progress to renal failure. In a cohort of 22,460 individuals with stage 3 or 4 CKD served by the health maintenance organisation Kaiser Permanente Northwest, the risk of progressing to renal failure and needing to start renal replacement therapy was just under 5%. In a similar cohort of 16,553 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members with stage 3 or 4 CKD, the risk was just over 2.5%. Predictors of risk included age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), proteinuria/albuminuria, haemoglobin levels, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, and diabetes and its complications, but a model using age, sex, eGFR and albuminuria retained a strong predictive value.


Article title: Comment: Climate and health: a weather warning
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Winter 2016, Volume 21 Number 4
Pages: 91-91
Intro: The NHS is entering winter under pressure from increased demand and worsening finances. Emergency admissions from A&E departments, which usually peak in winter, continue to increase. In September 2016 there were 476,000 emergency admissions from A&E departments, 2.6% higher than the same month in 2015. Of more concern is the delay in discharging patients; 134,300 days of acute care in the NHS were lost because of delays in the transfer of care in September 2016. This is the highest number since monthly figures were first captured in 2010, and an increase of nearly 40% from September 2015, when there sector. The majority of delays were due to patients awaiting further non-acute NHS care or social care packages in their homes.


Article title: Comment: Moving on up – preparing for adult healthcare
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Autumn 2016, Volume 21 Number 3
Pages: 59-59
Intro: Precision medicine aims to combine both individual and population-based data to understand a patient's disease more precisely, and so select treatments with more predictable, safer and cost-effective outcomes. Genomic medicine provides an important platform and exemplar for the development of treatments that are both personalised and precise, but in this issue of the British Journal of Renal Medicine, Donal O’Donoghue makes it clear that personalised medicine needs to be applied to all aspects of healthcare (see page 80).


Article title: Comment: Obesity and renal disease: weighing up the risk
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Summer 2016, Volume 21 Number 2
Pages: 31-31
Intro: In 2014, 41% of men and 31% of women in England were overweight (defined as a body mass index [BMI] from 25 to less than 30 kg/m2), and around a quarter of adults were obese (BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more). Two per cent of men and 4% of women were morbidly obese, with a BMI of 40 kg/m2 or higher. The association between being overweight or obese and an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well established.


Article title: Comment: Water’s edge
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Spring 2016, Volume 21 Number 1
Pages: 3-3
Intro: For many haemodialysis patients with minimal urine output, fluid restriction has an unacceptable impact on emotional well-being and quality of life. For some patients with polycystic kidney disease, the converse is true; they must learn to cope with the consequences of a high fluid intake and urine output in order to prevent the need for renal replacement therapy, and the associated distress of fluid restriction. Tolvaptan, a vasopressin receptor antagonist, slows decline in kidney function in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; however, some patients are unable to tolerate treatment because of polyuria, nocturia, thirst and polydipsia.


Article title: Comment: The art of renal medicine
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Winter 2015, Volume 20 Number 4
Pages: 87-87
Intro: Hospital environments should promote the health and well-being of patients and staff, helping to alleviate the anxiety associated with a stressful environment. Aesthetics within a hospital are an important but often neglected area, despite increasing evidence of the positive impact the arts can have.


Article title: Comment: Salt to taste
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Autumn 2015, Volume 20 Number 3
Pages: 59-59
Intro: For many years, the four basic tastes were considered to be sweetness, sourness, bitterness and saltiness. The Japanese have recognised a savoury taste, called umami, for over 100 years, but it was not widely accepted as the fifth basic taste until after the 1st International Symposium on Umami Taste in Hawaii in 1985. Taste buds in the mouth and throat process and integrate these tastes to determine whether they are perceived as pleasant or unpleasant.


Article title: Comment: Self-preservation
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Summer 2015, Volume 20 Number 2
Pages: 31-31
Intro: Between one third and a half of all arteriovenous fistulas created for haemodialysis fail to mature. Considerable attention has been paid to the factors associated with the failure of fistulae to become established. Diabetes, increasing age and female sex have been variably reported to reduce the chance of fistula maturation in some, but not all, studies. In contrast, treatment with calcium-channel blockers and low haemoglobin levels have been associated with successful functional fistula maturation. At a local level, the importance of shear stress and flow-mediated dilatation have been defined, and biological factors that might contribute to luminal narrowing have been identified. While neointimal hyperplasia has been implicated as a key factor in stenosis, pre-existing venous intimal hyperplasia does not appear to predispose to postoperative arteriovenous fistula stenosis.


Article title: Comment: Living longer on dialysis: the ethnic enigma
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Spring 2015, Volume 20 Number 1
Pages: 3-3
Intro: Estimated life expectancy differs among ethnic groups in the UK. In 2001, life expectancy at birth in England and Wales was 76.4 years for White British men and 80.8 years for White British women. Bangladeshi men had the lowest life expectancy, estimated at 73.2–73.3 years. For women, the Pakistani group had the lowest life expectancy, but estimates varied between 77.1 and 79.3 years. In the USA, life expectancy at birth in 2009 was 78.8 years for the White population, and 74.5 years for the Black population. Differences in disability-free life expectancy at birth between different ethnic populations are even more striking. Disability-free life expectancy at birth was 61.7 years for White British men and 64.7 years for White British women. In comparison, disability-free life expectancy was reduced by six years for Pakistani men, 9.1 years for Pakistani women, 7.5 years for Bangladeshi men and 7.6 years for Bangladeshi women. It was also significantly lower for men and women from the White and Black Caribbean, Indian, other Asian and other Black communities.


Article title: Comment: Dietary restriction in renal failure: un piccolo sacrificio
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Winter 2014, Volume 19 Number 4
Pages: 3-3
Intro: In 1963, Giordano described the reduction in uraemia that followed he introduction of a low protein diet providing essential amino acids. The following year, Giovannetti and Maggiore reported the effects of a low protein diet in eight patients with advanced kidney failure.


Article title: Comment: Accessing technology
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Autumn 2014, Volume 19 Number 3
Pages: 3-3
Intro: In 1960, Quinton and colleagues described the development of a technique for the long-term cannulation of arteries and veins that allowed haemodialysis to be used for patients with chronic renal disease.


Article title: Comment: The facts of life
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Summer 2014, Volume 19 Number 2
Pages: 3-3
Intro: In 1971, Confortini and colleagues reported the case of a 35-year-old woman who became pregnant after receiving haemodialysis (HD) for 32 months for end-stage renal failure resulting from chronic glomerulonephritis. Twice-weekly HD for 24 hours per week using a Kiil dialyser was maintained throughout the pregnancy.


Article title: Comment: Planning ahead
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Spring 2014, Volume 19 Number 1
Pages: 3-3
Intro: Life expectancy at birth, for infants born in England and Wales between 2010 and 2012, was 79.1 years for males and 82.9 years for females. For men aged 65, life expectancy increased from 17.6 years in 2006–08, to 18.5 years in 2010–12. For females of the same age, life expectancy increased from 20.3 to 21.1 years over the same period. In 2011, 9.2 million people living in England and Wales were aged 65 and over. This was an increase of almost one million from 2001, when 8.3 million were 65 and above. In 2011, more than half of those aged 65 reported having a long-term health problem or disability, which limited their daily activities.


Article title: Comment: Doctors' orders
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Winter 2013, Volume 18 Number 4
Pages: 3-3
Intro: Most patients discharged home are taking more drugs than when they came into hospital.1 In a prospective study of 1,155 patients aged over 65 who were discharged from hospital, the prevalence of polypharmacy, defined as the concomitant use of five or more medications, rose from 51.9% at admission to 67.0% at discharge.2 Being discharged on more than five different medications is more likely if patients have chronic kidney disease (CKD), or a diagnosis of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Patients with a combination of CKD and diabetes, or CKD and heart failure, were taking an average of eight drugs on discharge.3 The most commonly prescribed drugs at discharge are antithrombotic agents, drugs for dyspepsia, diuretics, angiotensin antagonists, beta-blockers, lipid-modifying agents and drugs to lower blood glucose.


Article title: Comment: Staying home
Author name(s): John Bradley
Journal: British Journal of Renal Medicine
Issue: Autumn 2013, Volume 18 Number 3
Pages: 3-3
Intro: Empowering patients to make an informed choice of treatment modality is a key element of predialysis care. A recent single-centre UK study highlighted the importance of good information provision and predialysis education to patients choosing self-care therapies. Providing accurate, up-to-date information can be challenging when techniques and survival rates are continually improving, and data are necessarily based on cohorts rather than individuals.


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The British Journal of Renal Medicine was previously supported by Baxter Healthcare from 2011 to 2013, by Sandoz in 2011, by Shire Pharmaceuticals from 2006 to 2011, by Ortho Biotech and Shire Pharmaceuticals in 2005, by Ortho Biotech from 2000 to 2005 and by Janssen Cilag from 1996 to 2000.

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